Episode 413

MAN OF WORTH

Dive deeper into this episode with exclusive sketches, production designs, and fun facts delivered directly from the Outlander crew.

INSIDE THE SCRIPT:
MAN OF WORTH

See what the crew says about your favorite scenes.

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This was a lovely little scene with Jocasta and Brianna where we re-establish Brianna’s state of mind. She’s worried about her parents, and asks, “What if they’re never coming back? What if he’s already dead?” We liked playing Jocasta’s promise that she would take care of her, and also revealing Brianna’s fears about whether her baby will be a monster like Stephen Bonnet. It’s poignant that Bree confides in the aunt she’s had such a contentious relationship with so far, and nice that they bond here. However, when rough cuts showed that the episode was running long and something had to be trimmed, this is one of those scenes that, while sweet, was not absolutely essential, and sadly, had to be left behind. However, it will be included in the deleted scenes section of the DVD box set!

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This scene with Jamie scouting the Mohawk ultimately proved a more dynamic and tension-filled opening for the episode. We wanted to see a bit of life in the Mohawk village, and research showed that they played lacrosse, so we included that in the description, and it made the scene more unique and visually interesting.

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We wanted to establish that Young Ian had picked up some of the Native American language not only from John Quincy Meyers, but also from spending time hunting with his Cherokee friends and his interest in the Native American culture. We also needed to establish Jamie learning a couple of Mohawk words so that he could communicate on a basic level with them.

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Some of this dialogue was trimmed for length, such as the talk about Dogface. However, this scene is a good example of how lines which are not in the script, can be added after filming as “ADR” lines. When we watch episodes in the editing room, we occasionally realize that we need an added line. In the script, Kaheroton’s line, “What is he to you that you would come all this way?” was written so that Ian struggles to answer—then Kaheroton decides to take him to the Chief. When watching the episode however, we realized it would be better if Ian actually answered so we added a line where Ian replies off-camera, “Because he is important to our family.” It’s a line that John Bell then recorded in a sound booth and was added to the episode long after filming was over.

 This season, we hired Mohawk advisors for scenes that included the Mohawk and worked closely with them to make sure that our portrayals were authentic, and especially to help us with the Mohawk language. They provided all the translations for our dialogue and helped write them out phonetically so that our actors could learn them.

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This script in particular had several lengthy and complicated scenes that involved many actors and moving parts. These scenes are very challenging for directors to shoot and require many takes from many angles to make everything flow smoothly. They take a long time to shoot, and also take up a lot of screen time, so you’ll notice that in these large scenes, trims are made. In this particular scene, the bit where Claire helps a boy with his dislocated shoulder was edited out for time. It requires the skills of a talented film editor to trim out material and piece the footage back together in a way that looks natural. This was a tricky sequence to edit but was skillfully and smoothly done. The critical part of the scene was when the Mohawk noticed Otter-Tooth’s stone that Claire is wearing, and we needed to get to that quicker.

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This scene with Jocasta and Murtagh was fun to write, as these two characters are flinty and spark off of each other. An arc was built through the scene to show them getting along and enjoying each other’s company, yet giving each other a bit of a hard time, and ultimately getting into a tiff when Murtagh realizes Jocasta is trying to marry Brianna off to a Redcoat.

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The story of Otter-Tooth was one of my favorite parts of Drums of Autumn, and I was excited to portray his story here. We needed a device to get his story on screen and chose to do it through the character of Wahkatiiosta. On television, it’s hard to have a character give a big speech where she’s talking us through a story. Therefore, I came up with the idea to use “flash cuts” of Otter-Tooth, which can be effective when peppered throughout a long monologue such as this. I knew we had the actor who played Otter-Tooth, from Episode 405, so we brought him back and the director shot these small moments (what’s called MOS, which means he shot them without any sound). Later we used “ADR” to add voices where needed, such as Otter-Tooth ranting to himself by the fire. These flashes to Otter-Tooth are interesting for audiences so they can visualize the words of the story being told, and are cool and atmospheric, adding a nice, stylized touch to these scenes.

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A lovely, short scene with Murtagh and Brianna, where two important pieces of information come to light. One—when Murtagh asks Brianna if it brought her peace to see Bonnet, and her simple answer is “Some. Enough.” This lets us know that she did get something out of her harrowing visit to her rapist’s jail cell. Two—Murtagh clearly wants Brianna to forgive Jamie, and we learn here by her answer, that she has calmed down and thought deeply about what happened and has now decided to forgive her father.

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We tried to think of a way that this small group could actually sneak into a Mohawk village at night without being detected, as the Mohawk are very savvy and on alert with guards around the village, so instead of coming from the woods, we came up with the idea that they approach from the water. From that, I thought of this image of canoes gliding silently toward the village at night. I was impressed when the director came up with the idea to use a drone and shoot the canoes from overhead. It was a beautiful and ethereal shot. By the way, those are our actual actors in the canoes—even Rollo took a ride that night!

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These three small scenes, although only two pages in length, are another example of a large scene with many actors and moving parts and in this case, it’s an action scene. These scenes alone can take several days to shoot. The old writer’s adage “Atlanta burns,” refers to a description in Gone With the Wind. It’s a metaphor for how a small bit on a page could actually be the hardest and most difficult to shoot. Our “Atlanta burns” here is “Jamie and Claire rescue Roger,” and was one of the hardest things to shoot in this episode. The director Stephen Woolfenden did an amazing job with the complex blocking needed to portray a realistic rescue sequence, especially one that took place at night in the cold and rain.

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The writers talked early on, even when we first decided to keep Murtagh alive, that he would someday have a romance with Jocasta. In this season, the plan was to roll their relationship out slowly, as they get to know each other again. It seemed a natural coupling to us, since Murtagh had been in love with Ellen, Jocasta’s sister and Jamie’s mother. Of course, this love was unrequited, although he got Jamie as a godson. Murtagh has devoted his life to Jamie, and never had the happiness of a woman of his own. We thought it was time to give Jamie’s godfather some happiness, and though it’s not in the book, we imagined that it was possible Jocasta had a long-time crush on Murtagh, but kept her feelings for him hidden since he was in love with her sister. Now that he’s reappeared, she is drawn to him once again. We initially thought to put their relationship on a slow boil in this episode, and get it started with perhaps a flirtation or a kiss, but the more we talked about it, we decided it would make sense for these two passionate and fiery characters to move faster. It felt organic given their history and personalities that sparks could fly during an argument—and those sparks lead to sexual passion—so I had Jocasta throw whiskey in Murtagh’s face then cut to them in bed. It was one of the most fun scenes to write. But before they hop into the sack, I knew that argument needed to have gravity to it, and not just be something to bicker about, so we chose an important issue where they were on different sides—the Regulators mounting a rebellion was a subject where it was easy to give them opposing views—and then of course, as Jocasta’s feelings are stirred up, she responds with the “I never liked you…” speech which was a classic “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”  J

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This was probably the biggest and most important scene in this episode, as Jamie offers to trade himself for Roger, simply saying, “Take me.” In the room, we referred to it as our “The Last of the Mohicans” scene, as we were inspired by that movie where there was a similar dilemma. Young Ian trading himself instead of Jamie is, of course, from Diana’s book, although we chose to do it a bit differently. In the book, we see a naming ceremony where Young Ian is transformed into a full Mohawk, while Jamie and Claire leave, accepting the fact that Young Ian is now part of the tribe. We felt it would be more dramatic for Young Ian to literally be torn from Jamie’s arms and say goodbye with much more uncertainty about what will happen to him. Although Jamie hates leaving his beloved nephew, he ultimately honors Young Ian’s decision.

 We were careful to lay the track and show that Young Ian has been fascinated with Native American culture. Ever since he met John Quincy Meyers, and also from spending time hunting with the local Cherokee, he has been drawn to their lifestyle, and a part of him feels like he belongs here. He’s always been an adventuresome lad, and takes after his uncle Jamie in that way. In this episode he truly becomes a “man of worth,” something that Jamie said to him back in Episode 401, and this is Ian’s way to prove himself—by not only saving Roger and making up for the mistake that was made, but also saving Jamie by offering himself to the Indians.

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We always try to keep “iconic” lines from the book. The line where Jamie says “Cuimhnich,” or “Remember” in Gaelic, was one such line, and we made sure to include it in this heartbreaking scene.

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The delicious reveal of Jocasta and Murtagh in the sheets was a joy to write and a joy to film, and we hope the audience will be as delighted by it as we are.

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This is a scene that was not in the book, but that we talked about a lot because we wanted to see Roger vent his anger at Jamie about getting beaten and show that Jamie is man enough to know that he owes Roger for that mistake. This scene was always planned as an intercut with the gauntlet that Young Ian is going through, as in some ways this is also Young Ian enduring punishment he feels he deserves for selling Roger.

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This is the gauntlet scene—which you remember Roger was put through in the previous episode. The Mohawk were testing Roger for his strength, and if he made it through, he could be accepted into the tribe, but Roger was weak and injured from his journey, and couldn’t make it though. Here, we decided to put Young Ian through the gauntlet, which is not in the book. Because he’s young and strong, he makes it.

One of my favorite parts of the episode is Young Ian’s face when he realizes he’s made it and is accepted in the tribe. John Bell did a phenomenal job with this, and the pure joy he shows is an incredible contrast to the sadness shown only hours before, when he parted with his family and now joins his new family.

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A fun little bit with Jocasta and Murtagh in the afterglow. It was cut for time, but will appear in the deleted scenes on the DVD.

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These are key scenes, as this is where Jamie and Claire have to tell Roger that Brianna is with child, possibly from her attack. It’s now Jamie’s turn to vent and unleash his rage on Roger, as he blames Roger in part for why Brianna was raped.

 Jamie, as a protective father figure, also pressures Roger into making a quick decision—to be a man, come back with them, and claim Brianna and her child—but it was also important to play Claire as a voice of reason, as she tells Jamie to give Roger time to think. It’s a lot to take in, in  the moment, considering everything Roger has been through and it’s an important decision, one that he should be sure about.

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I love the way that all the ladies (Phaedre, Lizzie, and Jocasta) are there for Brianna during the birth, and also to be supportive afterwards when Brianna must face meeting her baby that she harbored so much fear about, due to the traumatic way he was conceived. It was fun to give Jocasta the line about choosing the baby’s birthday so that it appears he was born in wedlock—how very “Mackenzie” of her! Sophie did a beautiful job at portraying a myriad of emotions as she holds her baby for the first time, looks into his face, and falls in love with him—no matter who the true father is.

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A short scene, but so important, as Brianna sees that Roger has not returned with Claire and Jamie. In an early version of this script, the episode actually ended here, with Brianna saying, “Where’s Roger?” Then it would have cut to black, leaving a cliffhanger into next season. However, after much discussion, we were reluctant to leave the audience unsure if Roger would return, and decided that after all they’ve been through this season, this couple deserved a happy ending.

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We wanted a small beat here for Jamie and Murtagh to discuss the fate of Bonnet—another cliffhanger for next season.

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This was just meant as a sweet mother-daughter bonding scene, as Claire comforts Brianna about Roger not coming back.

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This was the very last scene added to the script, only days before it was shot. We knew we needed a transition from when Claire and Jamie return home, and before they leave for Fraser’s Ridge, and then a scene that showed Brianna reluctantly accepting that Roger wasn’t returning to her. We only had a small amount of time on our schedule to shoot this, so this short scene of the family around the dining room table accomplished what we needed, by simply showing the empty chair, and then Brianna coming to take her place with her family. Although not a word is spoken, it powerfully conveys the sadness of her resignation, and yet, the comfort that she is surrounded by family and will be all right with the people who love her.

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We were hoping the audience had really been led to believe that Roger wasn’t returning, and we hoped that this short scene, where Brianna sees him from the window, would be a nice twist.

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We embraced the romance of this moment—Brianna running across the grounds of River Run—and just went for it. It’s a classic move to have young lovers running towards each other after being torn apart, but we felt it worked here, and our hearts should be in our throats as Brianna and Roger reunite. Perhaps my favorite line in the whole script is when Roger says, “Take me to see my son,” letting Brianna know in no uncertain terms that although he took some time to come to terms with the situation, he loves her and always has. Roger shows himself to be a man of worth by taking his place back in the family.

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We always chuckle at this scene, as the fun thing is that before Murtagh goes to hide, he and Jocasta have what they think is a subtle, secret embrace, but it’s clocked by Jamie and Claire who have a “WTF” moment when they realize there’s something going on between Jamie’s aunt and godfather!

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Since we decided not to use the “Where’s Roger?” line as a cliffhanger, we still needed some twist, something that would be the bridge to Season 5. From the very beginning of this season, we had always planned that since Jamie makes “a deal with the devil” to get the land and build the home that he and Claire wanted so passionately, that by the end of the season, the Devil would come to call. Jamie and Claire knew this was a risk they were taking by accepting Tryon’s offer of land, and it felt right for the Devil to call in his chip and tell Jamie to gather a militia. Just as Claire and Jamie are settled in their new home, their world is upended once again—the cherry on top is that Jamie is ordered to hunt and kill his own godfather. Stay tuned for Season 5!

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Closer Look:
Filming the Episode

Costume Design:
Jocasta

At River Run, Jocasta’s look “demonstrates a relaxing of Jocasta’s formal attire and indicates a softer feel whilst her relationship with Brianna becomes more open and almost maternal. The Pet-en-l’ier, with sacque back is made from an overdyed cotton print fabric with self-ruched trim and shot metallic silk edging,” says Co-Costume Designer Nina Ayers.

“The caraco was made from a digitally printed cotton sateen with a braided striped sleeve and stomacher,” she continues.

Set Design:
The Mohawk Village

The Art Department researched the Mohawk Village for over a year. Get a behind-the-scenes look at what went into creating it.

Costume Design:
The Mohawk

Describing the Mohawk, Co-Costume Designer Nina Ayers explains, “Wahkatiiosta wears the traditional Mohawk moccasins, leggings, garters and deer hide skirt, coupled with an oversized men’s trade shirt belted with a sash and practical leather belt. She wears a porcupine quill-worked bag with a finger-woven strap and quill-worked neck sheath. Her shell amulet has the ‘wolf’ design etched into it. I specifically designed this to become the ‘symbol’ of the village to help Young Ian identify where Roger had been taken to. The waistcoat, which she wears with her rebel warriors to retake the opal, is covered in trade ring brooches, usually worn as decoration. I decided to show signs that it had once been fully covered in them to act as an armor.”

For Chief Tehwahsekwe, “Drawing on the vast research into the Mohawk of the period, the Chief wears a military-style coat with the sleeves removed and a trade shirt coupled with the traditional moccasins, leggings, garters and breechclout of the period. Color and pattern were most revered, as were the traditional skills such as the porcupine quillwork seen on his otter bag and headdress. The 9-stranded wampum necklace held in 3 sections represents the 3 Mohawk clans of the time: the bear, wolf, and turtle clans,” she says.

EXPLORE
  • INTRO
    MAN OF WORTH
  • INSIDE
    THE SCRIPT
  • Closer Look:
    Filming the Episode
  • Costume Design:
    Jocasta
  • Set Design:
    The Mohawk Village
  • Costume Design:
    The Mohawk