Episode 310

HEAVEN AND EARTH

Dive deeper into this episode with exclusive sketches, production designs, and fun facts delivered directly from the Outlander crew.

INSIDE THE SCRIPT:
HEAVEN AND EARTH

See what the crew says about your favorite scenes.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

The title “Heaven and Earth” was inspired by a line of dialogue pitched by Ron Moore—it was a challenge from Jamie to Fergus that you’ll see later in the script. I liked it as a title, in part, because of what it leaves out: the ocean, which is the setting of the entire episode. Heaven is the ever-present horizon; earth (land) is the thing you long to see, finally, at the end of your voyage…the thing that tells you you’ve made it.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

We decided to go “back in time” a little and show Episode 309’s cliffhanger ending from Jamie’s point of view. We wanted to start with Jamie realizing that the Porpoise was making sail and leaving with Claire on board—something wonderfully implied in the books, but not seen. Then, as you start to write the scene, you realize you can’t just start on Jamie seeing the ship leaving, you have to think about what he was doing before he saw that. He was watching the ship with an eagle eye, of course, but what else was going on? So I came up with this potpourri bit with Fergus —a bit of humor, a bit of character, and something that reminds the audience of the tension that lingers between Jamie and Fergus from the previous episode.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Captain Raines was such a fun character, and played so well by Richard Dillane. We really wanted to see him, not as a villain, but as a man who knows what needs to be done to get his crew and cargo safely to land. There is a law of the sea at play here.

It was so much fun doing all of the ship research for this episode—“Helm a-lee,” “Belay that order,” “Captain of a seventy-four” (which refers to the number of guns on our British Man-of-War)—the navy customs vs. the merchant customs. Great fun.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Love the standoff at the end of this scene. I can’t tell you how great it is to write for our cast. Add to that a fantastic guest cast, including a group of fantastic South African actors and a great director like David Moore and we were in tremendous hands.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

LWe took great pains (and had great fun) making all of the “sick” in this scene look as real and gross as possible. Much of the vomit was actually soup and milk and chunks of real food, so the below decks set began to smell pretty bad. Realism!

Claire’s line, “Thankfully, Jones, most of this is vomit.” One of my best lines…if I don’t say so myself. 😀

Caitriona is so great in this scene—as always. And Albie Marber, who plays Elias Pound, is a wonderful young actor.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

At one point we were going to have Claire imagine seeing Jamie climbing over the gunwale with a knife in his teeth, but we decided against it. Even in a moment of hopeful imagination, we were a little afraid that it would beg credibility. oo much like an old pirate movie. But I do love this moment of Claire looking out to sea, wondering where Jamie is and when they’ll find each other again. And then…Pound steps up and offers her a hat to protect her from the sun, and she’s back into it. Elias Pound was such a fun character to write. He’s in the book, and much of what he does in this episode is taken from the source material. It became very clear early on that the spine of this episode was going to be this very touching relationship between Claire and Elias.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

All of this stuff about making pure alcohol was in the script, but much of it was more or less off screen. As often happens in the adaptation process, you take what Claire (for example) says in narration, and make a scene out of it. It’s a lot of fun. It goes without saying that Diana gives us great material to work with. Overholt is in the book. His pomander of herbs is in the book. The two prisoners pressed into service, the discussion of food, the marine’s wife who makes the biscuits for the sick men…it’s all there. Figuring out a way to thread all of it into the episode is challenging and fun.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

It’s amazing to think that boys as young as seven were sent to sea on these navy ships. They were officers in training, and often, at Elias Pound’s age, held rank and authority over seasoned sailors. But they were still kids. That was rich stuff for us to play.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Fun little clue trail here…reaching into my procedural background just a little. Again, all of this is in the book, just drawn out in slightly different ways.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Always fun for Claire to make an enemy.

I would have thought “fine and dandy” was a modern phrase. Not the case.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

One thing we had to invent for this episode was a Jamie/Fergus storyline. In the book, we didn’t get to see what Jamie was up to once he realized Claire had been taken from him. (We do see one attempt to rescue her—he gets aboard the Porpoise after she’s jumped ship—but not the moments leading up to that.) We decided we wanted to see what those weeks in between were all about for him—after realizing she’d been kidnapped, and before the Artemis can catch up with the Porpoise or Claire. So we came up with this idea of Jamie being thrown in “the brig” for threatening Captain Raines in his ambition to get Claire back. We thought about how this episode could be an extension of Episode 309—the gulf that exists between Jamie and Fergus—and we thought: “What if Jamie told Fergus he’d give him his blessing to marry Marsali… but only if he helped him organize a mutiny?”

Sam and César are both really fantastic in these scenes.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

I loved this detail: that when they sewed a dead sailor into his hammock for burial, they would put the last stitch of the needle through his nose. On the off chance that he wasn’t dead, the pain would wake the sailor up! Then Ron told us he’d read that this task was often given to a friend of the deceased sailor—in this case, Pound. This allowed us a great emotional setup and call back for Claire in her relationship with Pound.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

The funeral. We took pains to get all of these details right. I’m really happy with how it all came together. It’s such a visual scene. David Moore directed it wonderfully. All of Leonard’s lines are taken from an 18th century Anglican Book of Common Prayer. (Hopefully no one notices, but the actors all knew slightly different words to the Lord’s Prayer—especially since we were doing the 18th Century wording!)

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

The rabbit’s foot was our invention. Sometimes it’s great to find a physical object to vest some action and emotion in—something to play through the episode, something to set up and then call back to. The rabbit’s foot, the needle through the nose…

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Annekje was a really fun character to write and to see come to life.

“Please keep do” was an adlib by Caitriona in rehearsal. She might have even said it as a joke in the moment—but it worked so well, we asked her to do it on camera! So funny and tender at the same time.

As I wrote this episode, I found that Jones was quickly becoming one of my favorite characters. Gustav Gerdener is a South African actor and he made so much out of a relatively minor character. Jones is in the book, but we made a little more of him—Claire needed someone other than Pound to talk to from time to time; and we needed to see a man go from not trusting or respecting this female doctor to being totally in her camp. (We see examples of the other sort of man as well.)

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Fun scene to write and even more fun to film. Claire pulling the chair between herself and Cosworth was all Caitriona. Worked great.

This section was a bit different in the book. A ship’s cook is mentioned in the book, though not by name, but we made more of him and turned him into a threat. We didn’t feel Captain Leonard was a threat, though dangerous in his own way. Cosworth was the way for us to embody the attitude that a lot of these sailors would have taken towards a woman with the temerity to order them around. They wouldn’t have liked it.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Fun scene to write and even more fun to film. Claire pulling the chair between herself and Cosworth was all Caitriona. Worked great.

This section was a bit different in the book. A ship’s cook is mentioned in the book, though not by name, but we made more of him and turned him into a threat. We didn’t feel Captain Leonard was a threat, though dangerous in his own way. Cosworth was the way for us to embody the attitude that a lot of these sailors would have taken towards a woman with the temerity to order them around. They wouldn’t have liked it.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Scenes 20, 21, 22, A23, 23, A24, 24, 25, A26, 27…um, as you can see, we lost a few scenes during the writing and shooting. We knew the episode was going to be long and had to find a more economical way of telling the story. In the end, we lost very little—the number of omitted scene numbers is misleading because initially we just moved scenes around; then we ended up cutting some. It’s always hard to do that (“Killing your darlings” as they say) —but it’s always taken as a challenge to tell an even better story.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Tompkins is back! Hopefully you didn’t see that coming.

Fun fact: We shot this episode in Cape Town, South Africa. En route to the country, my cell phone died. I was given a production phone—all fine and good—and in addition, my wife sent me a replacement phone from LA, which arrived the day we were shooting this scene. She’d activated the phone in LA, synced it with my account, all of that. Now—there’s a nine or ten hour time difference between LA and Cape Town. Thinking nothing of it, I turned on my new phone and made sure it was on silent. All good. Or not. ou see, even when your phone is on silent, any alarms you’ve set will not be. And when it’s 4:30 in the afternoon in Cape Town, it’s 7:30 in the morning in LA. And I had a 7:30 alarm set. And my phone had not yet updated to local time. And…I won’t say I ruined a take, but…I ruined a take.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

Always fun to shoot a decomposing body coming out of a cask of crème-de-menthe.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

We played Tompkins a little differently than in the book—a little more nefarious. But we also liked the idea that he was this sad sack of a guy for whom the last year or so had been pretty terrible—kind of like the biblical Job: a rotten string of bad luck. And in a way that makes him even more of a threat—because he literally has noting left to lose. “Here’s my neck. Put me out of my misery. I’ll be more than happy to see the inside of a casket.”

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

I love this storyline for Jamie and Fergus. I love that Fergus makes the ultimate sacrifice here—for both Marsali and Jamie. He refuses to break “Milord” out of the cell, even though he knows it means that Jamie will not give him his blessing to marry Marsali. But he does it because it’s the only way to keep Marsali and Jamie safe. Jamie’s passion for Claire is so understandable, so enviable really, but in this moment he’s blinded by it. And Fergus sees what needs to be done—even at the cost of his own happiness.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

Caitriona is amazing in this scene. This is the moment the whole episode has been aiming for, and I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out. Great work by all involved.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

We decided we didn’t need Captain Leonard’s words (Book of Common Prayer) in this scene. As is often the case…in this instance, less was more.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

We played this a little differently, too. Here, Claire gets onto the island, and almost gets away. We felt we needed this scene—needed to see Claire almost escape to Jamie—only to be thwarted. Everything is coming to a head here. We needed the hope, the desperation, the tension—the drive to the end of the episode.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

Love how Lauren Lyle played this scene.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

This scene was originally set above decks. We needed to place it below decks for the schedule—and it ended up being perfect of the story. Jamie gives his blessing, then goes up to help sail the ship—the only means left to him of getting back to Claire. And so we’re left with just Fergus and Marsali—and it’s the happiest moment of the episode and a great conclusion to their story.

Luke Schelhaas Annotation

So sad.

And then Claire jumps from the ship—which is of course from the book. It provided this great cliffhanger ending to the episode. From the moment we started breaking the episode, we knew that was the final moment. She jumps! Would you?

INSIGHT:
TYPHOID ON BOARD

“When we first arrived here, we started with all of the scenes on the Porpoise, and we were filming in the interior of the ship down in the galley. We had many extras all lying in hammocks that were strung everywhere, and they were all covered in vomit. Fake vomit that had been made to look like vomit, but also had the unintentional effect of really smelling like it. It was in the 30s temperature wise, and it was a very hot, smelly experience. Plus, add to that the gimballing, and I think all of us didn’t have to act too much when it came to our reactions, walking down to this really dank and smelly place.”

“As with everything in Outlander, we like to do things right. We like to be slightly accurate if we can, and certainly typhoid and the experience of typhoid is no different. There were many discussions about what would be in the vomit, how much vomit there would be, where it would be, and I know at the end of the day we went over and above making sure everyone on that ship felt as sick as they looked. The makeup department did a great job, but also the liquid mixture that we ended up using ended up sitting out on the deck quite a bit during the scenes. We gimbal the set, which means we rock it back and forth, and by the end of the day, I have to admit, I do suffer seasickness myself and the rocking back and forth combined with the play vomit that we had on the deck all day combined to make an atmosphere that would make anyone sick, myself included. And I didn’t even have typhoid. It was a day befitting Outlander, that we do everything accurate and to the tee, all the little details.”

CLOSER LOOK:
THE GALLEY OF THE PORPOISE

CLOSER LOOK:
SHOOTING THE EPISODE

EXPLORE
  • INTRO
    HEAVEN AND EARTH
  • INSIDE
    THE SCRIPT
  • INSIGHT:
    TYPHOID ON BOARD
  • CLOSER LOOK:
    THE GALLEY OF THE PORPOISE
  • CLOSER LOOK:
    SHOOTING THE EPISODE

WHICH JAMIE IS YOUR SOULMATE?

COULD YOU FIND JAMIE FRASER?

THE ULTIMATE OUTLANDER QUIZ

BACK TO QUIZZES

QUESTION 1 OF 10

What is Jamie’s full name?

  • James Andrew Malcolm Michael Fraser
  • James Andrew Murray Monroe Fraser
  • James Alexander Malcolm Murray Fraser
  • James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser

THE ULTIMATE OUTLANDER QUIZ

Season 3 of Outlander premieres September 10 on STARZ, but the big question is, how big a fan of the series are you? Here are 10 questions that will put your love of Outlander on the line. Are you a super fan? Or do you need to go back and catch up on a few episodes before the new season begins? Let’s find out.

BEGIN
TRY AGAIN

BACK TO QUIZZES

QUESTION 1 OF 10

What gift did Jamie give to Claire before they parted?

  • An amber ring
  • A dragonfly in amber
  • A piece of polished amber
  • A butterfly in amber

Could You Find Jamie Fraser?

If you were separated from Jamie Fraser, your one true love, could you find him again? He is centuries in the past. He may not even have survived the Battle of Culloden. What will you do to track him down? And will your knowledge of the past, and his future, help you reunite with him…or keep you searching forever?

BEGIN
TRY AGAIN

BACK TO QUIZZES

QUESTION 1 OF 10

Where would you love to spend your honeymoon?

  • Somewhere lavish and indulgent, with every whim catered for
  • Back to nature, with trees, streams, and clean air
  • Anywhere that’s warm, safe, and has plenty of food
  • It doesn’t matter, as long as you’re with the love of your life

WHICH JAMIE IS YOUR SOULMATE?

Throughout Outlander, Jamie has been through several changes. He’s the gallant and sensitive Highlander. The suave and secretive French society man. A fearless leader in the Jacobite troops. And now, in Outlander 3, we’ll see the outlaw Red Jamie…a brooding, solemn man in hiding. But which version do you truly belong with? Answer these questions and all will be revealed.

BEGIN
TRY AGAIN

FAN POLL

IN AN EPISODE FULL OF DRAMA, WHAT MOMENT HAD YOU MOST NERVOUS?

  • Claire trapped on a ship of sick men
  • Jamie being imprisoned
  • Claire jumping overboard
  • Finding out Jamie will be turned in

POLL RESULT

  • 100%

    Claire trapped on a ship of sick men

  • 100%

    Jamie being imprisoned

  • 100%

    Claire jumping overboard

  • 100%

    Finding out Jamie will be turned in